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2 Surprising Benefits of Employee Self-Service

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2 Surprising Benefits of Employee Self-Service

Times are a-changin’, and HR leaders are feeling it.

According to a 2016 Pew Research Center report, technology-driven shifts have increased a sense of self-reliance and independence in individuals. According to the study, “Nearly nine-in-ten Americans today are online up from about half in the early 2000s […]. Roughly three-quarters of Americans now own a smartphone, with lower-income Americans and those ages 50 and older exhibiting a sharp uptick in ownership over the past year.”

However, some HR methods like tedious paper-based forms fall short by not giving employees the technological autonomy to which they’re accustomed. This disconnect is problematic, especially as today’s employees increasingly expect the same technological standard in the workplace they experience outside of it.

If HR leaders want to give employees what they want, then they should utilize workforce technology – namely employee self-service portals – and allow employees to manage their information from day one.

Not only does giving employees full access to a single login system let them find answers to frequent payroll and HR questions, quickly receive training and make certain changes to their personal information when needed, it also relieves the busy HR professional from answering endless employee queries.

Still not convinced? Below are two more reasons why employees should be able to utilize HR technology.

1. It is More Efficient

Think back to the last time you put gasoline in your car. Chances are you pulled into a busy station, got out of your car, paid at the pump and filled your car with gas. But this wasn’t always the case. In the past, attendants waited outside of pumps and each time a person pulled his or her car up, the attendant pumped the gas. Although this method had its merits, it slowed down both progress and profit for stations. People were capable of pumping their own gas. Therefore, gas stations eventually accommodated them with pay-at-the-pump technology.

The same can be said for HR departments. With options like employee self-service portals, the employee of today is capable of uploading and managing his or her information. However, many HR professionals still manually enter employee data. Employers trust employees to do big things every day — things like performing open-heart surgery and erecting office buildings. Why wouldn’t companies allow those same employees to verify and enter their personal information? This autonomy allows HR leaders to focus on high-level work, like helping employees and the business thrive.

An article by the Society for Human Resource Management echoed this sentiment. “Employee self-service portals allow employees to have quick and easy access to HR-related transactions and services that HR personnel would otherwise have to provide. This can reduce HR’s tactical duties and free up time for more strategic pursuits, with realized cost savings in time and efficiency.”

2. It Can Mitigate Exposure

It may seem counter-intuitive, but giving employees access to their information actually can mitigate exposure for businesses. Take the example above of an employee self-service portal. When new employees complete forms electronically, they ultimately are responsible for collecting, entering and approving their information. They’re also responsible for ensuring their data is correct. If trusting employees with this task seems scary, remember: They know their information better than anyone does, and they have a stake in confirming its accuracy.

With Paycom’s technology, your employees have instant, online access to their own employment information, including compensation, on-demand training and performance goals, and reviews. It’s time for leaders to take advantage of technology that empowers both employees and HR departments. That’s what we call a win-win.


Brad Richardson

by Brad Richardson


Author Bio: Mr. Richardson joined Paycom in 2005 and has served as its Vice President of Operations since 2009. With more than 25 years’ experience in leadership roles, including managing a $100 million commercial real-estate portfolio at MetLife and two car dealerships, Brad focuses on developing future leaders as well as refining processes in order to support Paycom’s growth. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Southern Methodist University and his MBA from the University of Texas at Dallas. Outside of work, he enjoys playing golf, traveling and spending time with his wife and three children.

Why HR and PR Need to be Friends

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Why HR and PR Need to be Friends

Today’s tech has created an environment with 24/7 access and instant communication. Anyone, anywhere, at any time can share live company updates, photos and videos to countless followers, media outlets, investors and competitors.

This live and on-demand style of communication directly impacts your HR department, since employee actions and consumer satisfaction can be shared in seconds. Your employees, who directly engage with the brand, instantly can become either a champion or a liability.

Trending for the wrong reasons

Consider the recent heightened awareness around the airline industry’s customer service. With the average flight carrying an estimated 230 passengers, a flight crew may have a few hundred citizen journalists on any given flight. The environment has evolved into a “neighborhood watch” under which every employee action is open for documentation, praise or scrutiny.

Overnight, one of your employees – if not your entire company – can make headlines. Another example is last year’s viral video of an upset Michael’s customer claiming mistreatment at the register. The smartphone footage of the store manager remaining calm and composed through the customer’s anger quickly gained national media attention. The store employee received a wave of positive public support and the attention prompted Michael’s corporate office to release an official company statement on the incident.

Benefits of linking HR and PR

In some cases, like a recent incident with a national airline, once HR relates sensitive information to the PR team, it’s often too late to circumvent less-than-desirable online and media attention. Establishing early lines of communication between the two departments is an advantage not only to the general health of a business, but also to a company’s crisis plan.

Media attention is often generated by unexpected circumstances such as:

  • local and national awards and accolades
  • campus emergency
  • fatality or injury
  • consumers organically praising the brand a.k.a. employer brand lift
  • illegal employee activity
  • successful marketing campaigns going viral
  • destruction from natural disaster, power outage

With the speed and convenience of today’s communication, every interaction with a company can be immediately shared. Because of this, HR and PR should be closely intertwined within the fabric of a company. Individuals often are raised to learn that integrity is what you do when no one is watching. Now, everyone is always watching.

 Empowered employees are the best ambassadors

How can companies better prepare employees to understand the vulnerabilities of this emerging climate? By strengthening the relationship between your HR and PR departments and empowering your employees with the right training, which proactively educates your workforce on potential pitfalls of mobile technology. Your employees, properly trained on the dos and don’ts of online conversations, are now ambassadors instead of liabilities.

In the not-too-distant past, CHROs had little visibility into the market insights of the CCO and CMO. But now, with the growth of social media, today’s savvy executives recognize that their PR and marketing counterparts have a front-row seat to product feedback and how employees are performing in real time.

In order to avoid being tomorrow’s headline fodder, ensure that your HR and PR departments are developing social media and public relations training for your employees. Everyone, from the receptionist to the CIO, needs to be aware that their actions could be displayed to a public audience and even go viral.

We will discuss how HR and PR can join forces to communicate an organization’s value, culture and personality, which plays a key part in company branding and policy in part two of this blog, titled What Happens When HR and PR are BFFs.

Be sure to check out the latest episode of our HR Break Room podcast “Fight or Flight: What HR Can Learn from the United PR Disaster” to learn more about how HR can help prevent negative incidents by working closely with their PR and legal teams, and how to create policies that empower employees to mitigate tricky situations.

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Posted in Blog, Employment Law, Featured, Talent Management


Author Bio: A writer, speaker and young business leader, Jason has been the communications pulse for a number of organizations, including Paycom. A featured writer on human capital management technology, leadership and the Affordable Care Act, Jason launched Paycom’s blog and social media channels, helping empower organizations around the nation. Jason is attuned to the needs of businesses and recently helped develop a tool to aid organizations in their pursuit to comply with the ACA; one of the largest changes in healthcare the country has seen. While working in athletics for ESPN and FoxSports, Jason learned the importance of hard work and branding. In his free time he enjoys adventuring with his family, reading and exploring new areas to strengthen his business acumen.

reverification

Best Practices for Utilizing Section 3 of the Form I-9

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Best Practices for Utilizing Section 3 of the Form I-9

Employers are used to filling out Section 1 and Section 2 of Form I-9 because it’s required for every employee. However, Section 3 – otherwise known as the reverification process– can be a bit mystifying.

Who should be reverified?

Employees with expiring employment authorization or documentation should be reverified to ensure continued authorization to work in the United States. The need for reverification is determined by looking at the List A and List C documents that were presented when the I-9 was initially completed. The work authorization expiration date entered by the employee in Section 1, if any, also should be taken into consideration.

When should the reverification process be completed?

The reverification process should be completed prior to the expiration date of the employee’s authorization or documentation. The expiration date is found in two places: the date provided by the employee in Section 1, and the date recorded under List A or List C in Section 2. If these dates conflict, employers should use the earlier date to determine when reverification is necessary.

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) recommends reminding employees that their documentation will expire at least 90 days ahead of the expiration date. This gives them time to present a List A or List C document or receipt showing continued work authorization. Paycom’s Document and Task Management system helps to ease the burden on employers by providing reminders 90 days prior to an employee’s reverification date.

When should the reverification process NOT be used?

Knowing when you cannot reverify an employee is important, too. U.S. citizens and noncitizen nationals should not be reverified. Additionally, lawful permanent residents should not be reverified if they provide a Form I-551, Permanent Resident or Alien Registration Receipt card for Section 2. An employee’s citizenship status is found in Section 1, as well as at the top of Section 2. Also, List B documents – even if they expire – should not be reverified.

How do you complete Section 3?

To complete Section 3, simply examine the unexpired documents presented by your employee to determine if they appear to be authentic and relate to your employee. Then, record the document title, document number and expiration date, if there is one. Lastly, sign and date this section. You must use Section 3 from the most recent Form I-9, even if the employee’s original form is an older version.  Likewise, if you previously have completed Section 3 for the employee, you should use Section 3 on a new version of the form and attach it to the employee’s original I-9.

 Other instances in which you can use Section 3

Employers also may complete Section 3 when an employee is rehired within three years of the date that the Form I-9 was originally completed. To complete Section 3 for rehires:

  • Confirm that the original I-9 relates to the employee.
  • Determine if the employee is still authorized to work or if reverification is required by reviewing Section.
  • Enter the date of rehire in Section 3 if the employee’s work authorization is still valid.
  • If expired, request the employee’s valid List A or List C document and complete a Section 3 reverification.
  • Sign and date Section 3.

 

Name Changes

You also can use Section 3 to record when your employee has a legal name change. You are not required to update Form I-9 for name changes. However, the USCIS recommends maintaining correct information on an employee’s Form I-9. Similarly, you are not required to request documentation of a name change from an employee, but it is recommended in order to be reasonably assured of your employee’s identity if the government ever asks to audit the Form I-9.

Paycom’s Document and Task Management solution automates employment verification from within the Paycom system to help ensure compliance and reduce your exposure to audits and penalties from Form I-9 violations. Employees and employers can complete the Form I-9 online, including Section 3, utilize electronic signature verification, and securely store completed Form I-9s and supporting documentation within the Paycom system.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Document Management, Featured

Alyssa Looney

by Alyssa Looney


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Alyssa Looney monitors laws, rules and regulations to ensure that the Paycom software is up to date, specifically regarding immigration law and state law developments in the Western United States. She holds a JD and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. Outside of work, Alyssa enjoys cooking, being active, playing with her puppy and exploring Oklahoma City.

May the 4th

Disturbance in Your Workforce? May the 4th Be With You

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A short time ago in an employee suggestion box not far, far away, this note from a disengaged employee was discovered.

Dear Management,

Being a real trooper, I’ve faithfully served this empire for many parsecs. But lately, morale here is in the trash compactor. I’m close to “storming” out of here! Here’s why:

  • We don’t feel valued. It’s challenging to work for someone who acts like a dictator. (The black cape? A bit much.)
  • We want a comfortable working environment. These uniforms don’t exactly help. (I have to plan bathroom breaks 30 minutes in advance.)
  • We want to contribute, but we’re afraid the boss will choke us from across the room if he doesn’t like what we say. A little two-way constructive feedback could make a death star-sized difference. 
  • I find our lack of training disturbing. With the literal universe at our fingertips, why do we not have an online learning management system?

A disengaged staff is a real phantom menace. Don’t let this happen; awaken your workforce today with our “What Employees Want” toolkit to help you keep the force in your workforce as strong as possible.

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Posted in Blog, Employee Engagement, Featured, HR Management, Learning Management, What Employees Want

Rod Lott

by Rod Lott


Author Bio: As Paycom’s Creative Services Manager, Rod Lott brings more than two decades of experience in marketing, advertising, branding and journalism. A published author and a graduate of the University of Oklahoma, he has worked with such brands as Blue Cross Blue Shield, Sonic Drive-In and OU.

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