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Employee Engagement

7 Deadly Sins of Employee Engagement

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Even with the best of intentions, some of the methods chosen to improve employee engagement can backfire. Employee engagement can improve retention, strengthen a company culture and increase productivity, but all that quickly is ruined when any of these seven deadly sins is committed.

  1. Engagement before and after the onboarding process

“New hires can’t be disengaged; they just got here,” said no “best company” ever. Those who know better realize addressing employee engagement starts before day one. The origins of commitment happen during the interview process. Your job candidate is evaluating you as much as you are evaluating them.

Did the interviewer begin on time, was he or she prepared and gracious? Or, was the interview an afterthought and chaotic? Top talent will recognize how much intention you put into the interview preparation. The interview experience often speaks of company culture and sets expectations for employee engagement.

The onboarding process can be stressful for any new hire. With new information flooding their inbox, a new hire easily can become overwhelmed. New hire anxiety can be mitigated by training your managers with the best onboarding and engagement strategies in order to avoid an onslaught of information on day one.

Bottom line: If your company is ignoring early signs of a stressed employee, there’s a chance you have an engagement problem.

  1. Don’t reward employees with pay alone

It’s been said that “money motivates,” but have you ever stopped to consider the effect it really has? Several surveys through the years indicate money is not a leading contributor for employee motivation.

Higher drivers include:

  • peer motivation
  • the intrinsic desire to do a good job
  • encouragement and recognition
  • having a real impact

While it may be easy to give a bonus for a job well done, it’s not always the best option. Even some of the highest-paid individuals aren’t satisfied at work.

To improve engagement, show more appreciation with the proper thanks employees want and need.

  1. Don’t use intimidation to get results

We are impatient creatures by nature. Thanks to advances in technology, we are empowered to feel this way. When employees aren’t picking up a task quickly enough or things aren’t going as planned, it’s easy to feel as if intimidation will be effective.

But often, intimidation does more harm than good. Your employees want to feel safe, not like they are walking on eggshells. Leave your frustration at the door; there are far better behaviors for improving engagement.

  1. Give attention when needed

Not every employee requires your attention. Highly engaged employees are likely in a good headspace and don’t need the extra push. However, certain employees require more attention, especially new hires.

Don’t expend all your energy on someone who isn’t in need; this only wastes his or her time and yours. Closely monitor your workforce to determine where your attention is needed, as this will change from time to time.

  1. Don’t let issues play out how they will

There will be times when employees disagree with one another; however, if there is tension to any situation, management must step in. The fate of the argument cannot be left to chance. Employees, for the most part, can solve problems on their own, but tension is a completely different beast and, if handled improperly, can be detrimental to engagement. Not only that, ignoring festering employee issues could lead the company into terminating valuable talent or become involved in expensive and time-consuming litigation. At the very least, you could spend a large amount of your time and brainpower filling out paperwork or mediating in the HR conference room.

  1. Don’t survey employees without a communication plan

Surveys can be extremely beneficial if conducted properly. If you want to fix a problem with engagement, your best bet is to ask employees what they need and how you can do better. But don’t stop there.

The most important piece of the survey process is sharing the results. Letting employees know the outcome is important to the credibility of the survey. If they feel nothing will come of it, they are less likely to answer honestly or at all.

For optimum results, implement corrective action. If there is an area of concern suggested by the results, communicate that and then have a plan to change it. Better yet, ask employees their thoughts on how to remedy the situation.

  1. Don’t engage employees without technology

Personalized service is indeed an admirable trait in any business, especially when it comes to employee engagement. Employees respect and respond well to face-to-face interactions, but that’s not to say that HR technology can’t help improve engagement.

Popular software tools, such as employee self-service portals, take center stage in companies around the nation, and the benefits that come with them extend to employee engagement.

Employees are less likely to become disengaged when they can enroll in benefits, view pay stubs, submit time-off requests, take training courses, and access and sign reviews online – all from the comfort of home. Everything they need is at their fingertips, and that is a game changer.

Employee engagement certainly is worth addressing, so don’t give in to any of these temptations. Avoiding the aforementioned will keep your organization’s culture from going six feet under.


Chad Raymond

by Chad Raymond


Author Bio: With over 19 years of experience in employee engagement, benefits administration and government compliance, Chad has unparalleled knowledge in the fields of leadership and human resources. Chad has worked in several different capacities with Paycom including leading our product development team and HCM initiatives as well as the former director of Paycom’s service department. Chad’s vision and execution helped empower executives and their teams to reach their full potential, ultimately leading to his role as Paycom’s vice president of HR.

Just 2 Steps to Being More Productive

You Are 2 Steps Away From Being More Productive

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You Are 2 Steps Away From Being More Productive

Productivity often is touted as the Holy Grail of today’s workforce. Countless books and apps are packed to the brim with tips promising to make you more efficient, while today’s managers scour for — and promote — candidates with past episodes of grand productivity.

You would think that with such pushes, a steady increase in individual and workplace productivity would exist. You would be wrong.

The Myth of Productivity

In a recent Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the productivity change between 2007 and 2016 in the nonfarm U.S. business sector increased 1.1 percent, an all-time low since the 1940s. Scholars give a myriad of reasons for this dip, ranging from a decrease in innovation to repercussions from the Great Recession; however, this stark stat likely makes even the most motivated worker feel defeated

But the thing about leaders is they have something others lack: foresight. Leaders see the bigger picture. They believe that their actions actually matter, and in fact, that those actions can inspire others.

You can’t control the changes that come with working in a knowledge economy, but you can control what you do each day. Below are two proactive ways to incite productivity in your daily life.

  1. Prioritize Time

Think back to a time when you felt like you were crushing it.

Perhaps you were working on a report or managing a team, and you were completely engrossed in your task. Now think through your typical day: Likely, there are moments of productivity … and then you get a text or an email or a meeting request, perhaps all at the same time. Information is everywhere; it clouds our lives. A 2015 Deloitte study noted that in a single day, people exchange more than 100 billion emails, yet only one in seven of those emails could be qualified as extremely important.

Although technology has made space for innovation and ease, it also has been a metaphorical shock to the U.S. workforce’s system. Indeed, many experts who study time management have changed the ubiquitous phrase of “multitasking” to the more apt “rapid toggling” to communicate the futile effort of doing multiple things at once, even when technology promises we can.

Studies have shown that if you want to do deep work that puts you in a state of flow and ahead of your competitors, then you must prioritize uninterrupted, focused time. In fact, a recent article in Harvard Business Review outlined the importance of restorative silence for busy individuals: “Recent studies are showing that taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive to the complex environments in which so many of us now live, work and lead.”

You may ask (while frantically scanning your bursting inbox), “How do I do this?”

Start by identifying a time during your day when your presence isn’t really required. Perhaps you need to attend that recurring weekly meeting only every other week, or maybe you can send an employee in your stead. Assess your daily rituals — maybe that morning stroll around the office where you chat with everyone could happen later in the afternoon so your mornings are free from distraction. Is your office door always open? See what happens if you shut it for 30 minutes. Chances are no one will notice that time you’ve stolen away for yourself, and you’ll have space to focus on what really matters.

  1. Prioritize Values

There is a reason that successful companies put such stock in their values and vision: Clarity makes space for progress. In 2015, General Electric executive took time to verbalize the company’s values, after feeling the business was becoming too complex. Known as “the GE Beliefs,” those values acted as a road map for them to plot out and execute their top priorities.

A Deloitte University Press article noted, “The GE Beliefs play a large role in leadership development and are also used to change how GE recruits, how it manages and leads and how its people are evaluated and developed.”

GE is just one example of many companies putting emphasis on clearly articulating core values in order to spur output. And if successful companies are doing so, why wouldn’t you?

According to Inc. 500 entrepreneur Kevin Daum, “Much like company core values, your personal core values are there to guide behavior and choice.”

How do you craft a list of personal values? Glance over your job description, reassess your passions and future goals, and then put pen to paper. The list of values doesn’t have to be long, but it must be clear. To spur ideas, look at examples from companies like Zappos and Facebook.

Once you have your values nailed down, certain tasks that have been consuming your time likely will lose their urgency. For example, if innovation is part of your purpose, but the last time you researched new advances in your field was six months ago, then it’s time to reassess either your values or how you’re spending your time.

Productivity can be tricky to quantify, but creating a conducive environment is a great place to start. Making crucial space and aligning your daily tasks to your vision are two steps in the right direction.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Leadership, Talent Management


Author Bio: Oden-Hall is an award-winning public relations, communications and marketing professional with over 20 years experience driving corporate strategy for Fortune 500 companies. Her Oklahoma roots and passion coupled with her global experience and creative flair have helped her drive numerous successful strategic initiatives. She joined the Paycom team as Chief Marketing Officer in April of 2012.

What do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

What Do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

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What Do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

HR industry experts have devoted a lot of time and research into demystifying millennial employees, only to discover that this younger generation has more in common with mature, seasoned employees than once thought.

This is especially true when it comes to the desire for day-one productivity. The C-suite values new hires who can become contributors faster; millennial employees, who were born between 1981 and 2000, crave the opportunity to do just that.

So, the goal they share is desire to be immediately productive – to be a valued contributor as soon as they walk through the front door.

Getting an early start

Growing up when technological advances made instant gratification a way of life, millennials have come to expect it in almost every aspect of their lives, including work. Young employees want to feel purposeful in their jobs, and nothing meets that need quite like getting the chance to work on the first day, instead of filling out form after form and memorizing the alarm code.

One way to get there is by designing an onboarding process that gives new hires the ability to complete onboarding tasks efficiently, either on or before day one. Consider incorporating the following strategies into your plan:

  • “Preboard” new hires.

    Allow them to complete new-hire paperwork and train electronically, via an employee self-service portal. They can get the groundwork done before they even start in order to hit the ground running on their first day.

  • Assign goals and expand training.

    According to Gallup, half of employees don’t understand what’s expected of them at work. To prevent this type of uncertainty from affecting a new hire’s productivity, include training on his or her individual role, and what his or her job looks like when done well.

  • Introduce your culture.

    Understanding what your company values can help new hires feel confident about making smart decisions. Not only can this boost early productivity, but it can help build long-term engagement, too.

Just a few tweaks to the traditional onboarding process can help new hires devote more time and attention to the activities that will help them become a valued contributor sooner than later. And that’s something both your C-suite and millennial new hires will love.

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Posted in Blog, Employee Engagement, Featured, Leadership, Pre-Employment, Talent Management


Author Bio: Oden-Hall is an award-winning public relations, communications and marketing professional with over 20 years experience driving corporate strategy for Fortune 500 companies. Her Oklahoma roots and passion coupled with her global experience and creative flair have helped her drive numerous successful strategic initiatives. She joined the Paycom team as Chief Marketing Officer in April of 2012.

Oregon State Retirement Plan

Oregon Creates Landmark State Retirement Plan

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Oregon Creates Landmark State Retirement Plan

This year, the state of Oregon will launch a landmark, statewide retirement program: OregonSaves. This program requires private employers to automatically enroll employees in retirement accounts. The goal is to benefit almost 1 million Oregonians who currently lack access to employer-sponsored retirement programs.

OregonSaves has been in the works for the last few years and will officially kick off in July 2017 with a volunteer pilot phase. Full program implementation is scheduled to begin in November 2017, starting with employers who have 100 or more employees.

What This Means for Oregon Employers

Employers that do not offer retirement plans are required to inform employees about the program and automatically enroll them. Additionally, they will have to:

  • Provide employee data to the state to allow the state to set up accounts for the employee.
  • Setup payroll deductions for employees participating in OregonSaves.
  • Track employee decisions as to contribution levels or to opt out.

Employers who already provide retirement options do not have to offer OregonSaves. Those employers will complete a simple certification process.

What’s Next?

Oregon is the first state to offer a program of this nature. California and Illinois likely will launch similar programs by 2019. It is important to note, however, that there are currently bills pending in the federal legislature to overturn rules that make it easier for states to create such plans. If these bills pass, state programs could be stalled. Oregon does plan to move forward with its retirement plan regardless of how the legislature acts, so employers should be prepared. Paycom’s Benefits Administration Suite can help employers accurately track the data they will be required to transmit to OregonSaves.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Employment Law, Featured

Alyssa Looney

by Alyssa Looney


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Alyssa Looney monitors laws, rules and regulations to ensure that the Paycom software is up to date, specifically regarding immigration law and state law developments in the Western United States. She holds a JD and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. Outside of work, Alyssa enjoys cooking, being active, playing with her puppy and exploring Oklahoma City.

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