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Love the One You’re With: Three Keys to Increasing Employee Loyalty

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The success of your company depends on a variety of factors working in concert – a great service or product, efficient tools and protocols, strategic marketing. But perhaps most of all, the success of a company rides on the people who inhabit it.

Your employees bring your business to life and when they’re at their best, you thrive. Employees who are prospering want their companies to prosper and they’ll work to make beautiful music on your behalf. Unfortunately, the opposite is also true; when employees feel underappreciated or overworked, your reputation, turnover rates, talent acquisition costs and market value can suffer.

Encourage loyalty, productivity and professional growth among employees with two basic tools: efficiency and emotion. On the efficiency side, it’s vital that the organization be committed to streamlining the employee experience. An efficient, straightforward way to improve employee satisfaction is often shown through raises and bonuses. With Merit Matrix, Paycom’s Talent Management tool, it is easy to rate employee performance and budget for raises and bonuses; however, while monetary incentives are powerful motivators, they’re not necessarily the main determinants of a productive, happy staff.

That brings us to the emotional tools, the human element of human relations. Here are three instruments for nurturing feelings of fulfillment among your workforce, played in the key of E:

• Energy – Energize your employees by letting them pursue the aspects of your company they’re passionate about. It’s simple pride of ownership. From contributing to the internal newsletter to organizing grass roots marketing, employees reap greater satisfaction from projects they’re personally invested in. Set quantifiable goals so employees can measure results and managers can estimate the ROI of these passion projects. If you’re in need of a tool that ensures everyone is on the same page in regards to measuring these objectives click here.

• Eyes and Ears – As often as is feasible for the size of your company, meet face-to-face with every person you employ. Grab a coffee, let them talk, and listen to what they say. By understanding what your people love about their jobs and what needs improvement, you’ll retain experienced employees and keep that turnover rate low. And between meetings, keep communication lines open; good ideas can come from anyone, regardless of job title.

• Education – Crush productivity-killing boredom by allowing your employees to grow. Build time into your staff’s schedules for self-improvement; maybe it’s three hours a month to read the latest industry books or working lunches with guest speakers. If the company can afford it, support your employees’ growth through seminars, conferences or continuing education programs. Learning new skills or gaining certifications tells your staff their careers are advancing.

Since almost all employees who voluntarily leave jobs feel pushed away by dissatisfaction in the workplace rather than pulled toward a new job opportunity, you can increase retention – and productivity – by increasing the happiness of your people.

It all comes down to the harmony of working efficiently and working emotionally. If your HR processes are bogged down with redundancy and inefficiencies, consider updating them.  And if your people are confined to one-note, one-size-fits-all roles, loosen up. Treat your employees as the unique, talented individuals they are. Because when the individual succeeds, your company succeeds, too.



Author Bio: As a Human Resource Professional with over 20 years of experience, Jenny has extensive experience in management, mentoring, policy development and recruiting. Jenny's team player mentality and leadership abilities make her an elite HR Director who is always on top of the latest HR trends. She relentlessly directs associates and executives to achieve their maximum potential for both themselves and their companies.

Just 2 Steps to Being More Productive

You Are 2 Steps Away From Being More Productive

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You Are 2 Steps Away From Being More Productive

Productivity often is touted as the Holy Grail of today’s workforce. Countless books and apps are packed to the brim with tips promising to make you more efficient, while today’s managers scour for — and promote — candidates with past episodes of grand productivity.

You would think that with such pushes, a steady increase in individual and workplace productivity would exist. You would be wrong.

The Myth of Productivity

In a recent Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the productivity change between 2007 and 2016 in the nonfarm U.S. business sector increased 1.1 percent, an all-time low since the 1940s. Scholars give a myriad of reasons for this dip, ranging from a decrease in innovation to repercussions from the Great Recession; however, this stark stat likely makes even the most motivated worker feel defeated

But the thing about leaders is they have something others lack: foresight. Leaders see the bigger picture. They believe that their actions actually matter, and in fact, that those actions can inspire others.

You can’t control the changes that come with working in a knowledge economy, but you can control what you do each day. Below are two proactive ways to incite productivity in your daily life.

  1. Prioritize Time

Think back to a time when you felt like you were crushing it.

Perhaps you were working on a report or managing a team, and you were completely engrossed in your task. Now think through your typical day: Likely, there are moments of productivity … and then you get a text or an email or a meeting request, perhaps all at the same time. Information is everywhere; it clouds our lives. A 2015 Deloitte study noted that in a single day, people exchange more than 100 billion emails, yet only one in seven of those emails could be qualified as extremely important.

Although technology has made space for innovation and ease, it also has been a metaphorical shock to the U.S. workforce’s system. Indeed, many experts who study time management have changed the ubiquitous phrase of “multitasking” to the more apt “rapid toggling” to communicate the futile effort of doing multiple things at once, even when technology promises we can.

Studies have shown that if you want to do deep work that puts you in a state of flow and ahead of your competitors, then you must prioritize uninterrupted, focused time. In fact, a recent article in Harvard Business Review outlined the importance of restorative silence for busy individuals: “Recent studies are showing that taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive to the complex environments in which so many of us now live, work and lead.”

You may ask (while frantically scanning your bursting inbox), “How do I do this?”

Start by identifying a time during your day when your presence isn’t really required. Perhaps you need to attend that recurring weekly meeting only every other week, or maybe you can send an employee in your stead. Assess your daily rituals — maybe that morning stroll around the office where you chat with everyone could happen later in the afternoon so your mornings are free from distraction. Is your office door always open? See what happens if you shut it for 30 minutes. Chances are no one will notice that time you’ve stolen away for yourself, and you’ll have space to focus on what really matters.

  1. Prioritize Values

There is a reason that successful companies put such stock in their values and vision: Clarity makes space for progress. In 2015, General Electric executive took time to verbalize the company’s values, after feeling the business was becoming too complex. Known as “the GE Beliefs,” those values acted as a road map for them to plot out and execute their top priorities.

A Deloitte University Press article noted, “The GE Beliefs play a large role in leadership development and are also used to change how GE recruits, how it manages and leads and how its people are evaluated and developed.”

GE is just one example of many companies putting emphasis on clearly articulating core values in order to spur output. And if successful companies are doing so, why wouldn’t you?

According to Inc. 500 entrepreneur Kevin Daum, “Much like company core values, your personal core values are there to guide behavior and choice.”

How do you craft a list of personal values? Glance over your job description, reassess your passions and future goals, and then put pen to paper. The list of values doesn’t have to be long, but it must be clear. To spur ideas, look at examples from companies like Zappos and Facebook.

Once you have your values nailed down, certain tasks that have been consuming your time likely will lose their urgency. For example, if innovation is part of your purpose, but the last time you researched new advances in your field was six months ago, then it’s time to reassess either your values or how you’re spending your time.

Productivity can be tricky to quantify, but creating a conducive environment is a great place to start. Making crucial space and aligning your daily tasks to your vision are two steps in the right direction.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Leadership, Talent Management


Author Bio: Oden-Hall is an award-winning public relations, communications and marketing professional with over 20 years experience driving corporate strategy for Fortune 500 companies. Her Oklahoma roots and passion coupled with her global experience and creative flair have helped her drive numerous successful strategic initiatives. She joined the Paycom team as Chief Marketing Officer in April of 2012.

What do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

What Do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

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What Do Millennials and Today’s CEOs Have In Common?

HR industry experts have devoted a lot of time and research into demystifying millennial employees, only to discover that this younger generation has more in common with mature, seasoned employees than once thought.

This is especially true when it comes to the desire for day-one productivity. The C-suite values new hires who can become contributors faster; millennial employees, who were born between 1981 and 2000, crave the opportunity to do just that.

So, the goal they share is desire to be immediately productive – to be a valued contributor as soon as they walk through the front door.

Getting an early start

Growing up when technological advances made instant gratification a way of life, millennials have come to expect it in almost every aspect of their lives, including work. Young employees want to feel purposeful in their jobs, and nothing meets that need quite like getting the chance to work on the first day, instead of filling out form after form and memorizing the alarm code.

One way to get there is by designing an onboarding process that gives new hires the ability to complete onboarding tasks efficiently, either on or before day one. Consider incorporating the following strategies into your plan:

  • “Preboard” new hires.

    Allow them to complete new-hire paperwork and train electronically, via an employee self-service portal. They can get the groundwork done before they even start in order to hit the ground running on their first day.

  • Assign goals and expand training.

    According to Gallup, half of employees don’t understand what’s expected of them at work. To prevent this type of uncertainty from affecting a new hire’s productivity, include training on his or her individual role, and what his or her job looks like when done well.

  • Introduce your culture.

    Understanding what your company values can help new hires feel confident about making smart decisions. Not only can this boost early productivity, but it can help build long-term engagement, too.

Just a few tweaks to the traditional onboarding process can help new hires devote more time and attention to the activities that will help them become a valued contributor sooner than later. And that’s something both your C-suite and millennial new hires will love.

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Posted in Blog, Employee Engagement, Featured, Leadership, Pre-Employment, Talent Management


Author Bio: Oden-Hall is an award-winning public relations, communications and marketing professional with over 20 years experience driving corporate strategy for Fortune 500 companies. Her Oklahoma roots and passion coupled with her global experience and creative flair have helped her drive numerous successful strategic initiatives. She joined the Paycom team as Chief Marketing Officer in April of 2012.

Oregon State Retirement Plan

Oregon Creates Landmark State Retirement Plan

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Oregon Creates Landmark State Retirement Plan

This year, the state of Oregon will launch a landmark, statewide retirement program: OregonSaves. This program requires private employers to automatically enroll employees in retirement accounts. The goal is to benefit almost 1 million Oregonians who currently lack access to employer-sponsored retirement programs.

OregonSaves has been in the works for the last few years and will officially kick off in July 2017 with a volunteer pilot phase. Full program implementation is scheduled to begin in November 2017, starting with employers who have 100 or more employees.

What This Means for Oregon Employers

Employers that do not offer retirement plans are required to inform employees about the program and automatically enroll them. Additionally, they will have to:

  • Provide employee data to the state to allow the state to set up accounts for the employee.
  • Setup payroll deductions for employees participating in OregonSaves.
  • Track employee decisions as to contribution levels or to opt out.

Employers who already provide retirement options do not have to offer OregonSaves. Those employers will complete a simple certification process.

What’s Next?

Oregon is the first state to offer a program of this nature. California and Illinois likely will launch similar programs by 2019. It is important to note, however, that there are currently bills pending in the federal legislature to overturn rules that make it easier for states to create such plans. If these bills pass, state programs could be stalled. Oregon does plan to move forward with its retirement plan regardless of how the legislature acts, so employers should be prepared. Paycom’s Benefits Administration Suite can help employers accurately track the data they will be required to transmit to OregonSaves.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Employment Law, Featured

Alyssa Looney

by Alyssa Looney


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Alyssa Looney monitors laws, rules and regulations to ensure that the Paycom software is up to date, specifically regarding immigration law and state law developments in the Western United States. She holds a JD and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. Outside of work, Alyssa enjoys cooking, being active, playing with her puppy and exploring Oklahoma City.

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