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Learning Management Systems Matter

LMS 101: Why Technology is Crucial to Onboarding

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Learning Management Systems 101 is a weekly blog series exploring how employers can rethink traditional employee training and move toward e-learning solutions, which are faster, easier to access, and more cost effective. “LMS 101: Why Technology is Crucial to Onboarding” is the third post of the series.

LMS 101: Why Technology is Crucial to Onboarding

A staggering one third of new hires leave their position within the first six months, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. Reasons for quitting include not receiving clear guidelines regarding their responsibilities, inadequate training and lack of an effective and engaging onboarding process.

If you want to avoid employee retention pitfalls, consider how a learning management system (LMS) could play a valuable role in eliminating many new-hire challenges, turning disenfranchised employees into employee advocates who aid in driving impactful business results.

LMS at a Glance

An LMS is a software-based platform that provides the framework and tools needed for online training and learning. The system enables users to deliver, manage and track online learning content. Also, it comes with real-time communication tools that allow team members to easily share their knowledge with each other.

Onboarding Challenges and the Role of an LMS

Regardless of your industry, the goal of onboarding is to ensure that new hires are provided the proper foundation for a mutually beneficial relationship that lasts for years to come between an organization and its new employees. Onboarding is the pivotal moment in which new employees adopt your company’s vision and commit to their place within it.

New hires need to know:

  • the mission, values and culture of the organization
  • what their responsibilities are and how to perform them
  • who their managers, supervisors and colleagues are
  • the organization’s operating policies and procedures
  • any legal and company guidelines they need to follow

Imparting this information via classroom training can be time-consuming and expensive. Materials and instructor costs along with employee time away from work are just some of the expenses to cover. While in-person trainings has its proven benefits, trainings recorded for an LMS has the added benefit for individuals to easily revisit training presentations and documents.

An LMS can automate your new hire processes and allow you to design training programs that meet the needs of individual employees. HR professionals, managers and supervisors can develop straightforward courses that walk new hires through orientation and job-specific practices.

Eight ways an LMS strengthens onboarding:

1. Pre-onboarding – An employer’s ability to start the learning process actually happens before day one. Through a self-service portal, new hires can start on-demand trainings prior to their first day on the job. The course assignments could be a quick company welcome message and meet the team video, or it could assign the handbook or a short course pertaining to their actual role. This should be part of the ideal onboarding checklist that each new hire goes through prior to starting. Ultimately, any training done beforehand helps new hires become more productive and acclimate to the company culture faster.

2. Monitoring – Participant attendance and completion status can be monitored. This serves as proof that you delivered critical information, such as workplace discrimination and harassment policies. You’ll also be able to see whether new hires are responding well to orientation and training and whether corrective measures need to be taken.

3. Testing – New hire progress can be evaluated through quizzes and tests, allowing you to gauge employees’ competence and determine the roles for which they’re best suited.

4. Goal setting – Allows you to set clear goals and objectives for new hires, on a group or individual basis, resulting in a more well-defined and streamlined onboarding process.

5. Self-service – Employees can retrieve course information as needed and track their progress by simply logging into their self-service portal.

6. Multiple formats – Learning content can be created and presented in multiple formats, including PowerPoint presentations, videos and podcasts. Videos are especially effective for conveying not just job-specific training, but also the company’s values, mission and culture – as most people are visual learners and will recall what they see over what they read or hear.

7. Redefining the classroom – New hires can access training 24/7 from any computer or mobile device with an internet connection, eliminating the expense of classroom training and minimizing business downtime and disruption.

8. Universal programming – Orientation programs that are universal by design – such as benefits enrollment and general safety compliance training – can be assigned to all new hires across different departments and locations with the click of a button.

Ultimately, an LMS is more than an onboarding platform. It is also a vital resource for monitoring job performance and developing employees to their greatest potential even beyond the onboarding period.

To learn more about the evolution of corporate learning, how to refine your approach to employee training,  be sure to check out the first two posts of this series.


Jeff York

by Jeff York


Author Bio: Jeff York, Paycom’s chief sales officer, has more than three decades of sales experience and has held a variety of sales management positions; prior to joining Paycom In 2007, York spent 12 years with a legacy payroll provider, where he held a variety of sales management positions including vice president of sales for the major accounts division. York, a Texas Tech University graduate, also holds an MBA from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.

Employee Self-Service Software

Missing out on Key Functions of Your Employee Self-Service Software?

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Missing out on Key Functions of Your Employee Self-Service Software?

If you’re like most company leaders, you’re probably making use of employee self-service software to a certain extent. In fact, in a joint study by Paycom and HR.com, 88.5 percent of companies surveyed used self-service tools. And about 87 percent of these organizations considered self-service software to be the most efficient way to provide employees with payroll and HR information.

You can discover more of the results of this survey in our whitepaper, The Role of Self-Service Software: Get the Most out of a Crucial Technology.

However, we also found that a large number of the organizations surveyed aren’t getting as much out of their self-service software as they potentially could. They are leaving functionality on the table and missing out on the opportunity to streamline their training, ensure that forms are efficiently completed and securely stored, and improve the accuracy of information entered by their employees.

Streamlined Employee Training

Companies that use their employee self-service software as a platform for training are able to reach a large number of employees with one streamlined training effort, rather than scheduling several training meetings to accommodate staff schedules, wasting time and losing productivity.

Incorporating training videos and slideshows into existing employee self-service software allows your employees to complete trainings when their schedules allow.

In our research, companies are using self-service technology to serve many functions (some of the most common include accessing payroll information and enrolling in benefits). Unfortunately, only 39 percent of companies we surveyed that are already utilizing self-service software are taking advantage of employee training opportunities through that software. Most organizations are missing out on this opportunity.

Secure, Efficiently Completed Forms

The forms that your employees are already filling out can be integrated with an existing self-service software to make it easier for them to complete and ensure that you can store the forms securely and efficiently. We found that this is another area where many organizations have room for improvement.

Of the organizations we surveyed that used self-service software, HR entered 50 percent or less of employee information in only 40 percent of those organizations. In 29 percent of surveyed companies with self-service software, HR was still entering 90 percent or more employee data.

Having a way for your employees to fill out performance reviews, feedback surveys and other forms within employee self-service software allows them to complete the forms on their own time, allowing your HR department to focus on more mission-critical projects. It can also cut down on paper storage and allow anyone who needs access to the completed forms to find them in one secure location online.

Accurate Employee Information

One surprising finding from our study was that while 87 percent of respondents said that employee self-service software was helpful, HR still enters in over 50 percent of employee data for 60 percent of surveyed companies using self-service software. The most common barrier that kept organizations from having a majority of information entered by their employees (instead of their HR department) was a concern over the accuracy of employee-entered data.

That’s a valid concern, but from our research, employee-entered data has the opportunity to improve information accuracy. Over 80 percent of organizations we surveyed determined that employee-entered data helps hold employees accountable for the accuracy of the data—and 51 percent agreed that employee accountability for that accuracy reduces compliance risk.

In addition to a reduced compliance risk, having employees enter their own information can free up your HR department to do more strategic work. In fact, improving your company’s usage of employee self-service software can help your HR department save up to 10 hours per week!

Learn how other companies of all sizes are making use of their employee self-service software and what can be gained from these and other underutilized capabilities in our whitepaper, The Role of Self-Service Software: Get the Most out of a Crucial Technology.

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Posted in Blog, Document Management, Featured, HR Management, Learning Management, Payroll

Lauren Rogers

by Lauren Rogers


Author Bio: As a communications specialist at Paycom, Lauren Rogers keeps employees abreast of company news and events, and provides insight to industry leaders regarding issues affecting human capital management. With experience in marketing and communications, Lauren has written blogs and other materials for a variety of businesses and nonprofits. Outside the office, she enjoys gardening, testing new recipes and sipping something caffeinated with her nose in a book.

Changing Drug Screening Policies

4 Insights About Evolving Drug Screening Policies

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4 Insights About Evolving Drug Screening Policies

During the November 2016 election, eight of the nine states with marijuana-related decisions on the ballot voted to legalize the drug for medical and/or recreational purposes. This trend has gained traction across the country; today, more than half the nation has state laws in place that allow marijuana for medicinal use.

Marijuana legalization has created tension between state laws, federal law and organizational best practices nationwide, causing employers from numerous industries to revisit their current drug-screening policies to ensure they are best serving their people and the company. To learn more about how organizations could handle this shift in state policy, Paycom invited Sheehan Phinney attorney Jim Reidy to the HR Break Room podcast.

Listen to expert and attorney Jim Reidy from Sheehan Phinney discuss current and future drug laws on the HR Break Room podcast episode, “A New Leaf on Drug Policy Screening Policies: Time for a Change?”

Specific plans of action may be difficult to determine, but Reidy provided valuable insight and four major takeaways about quickly changing drug screening-policies.

1. Ask the Big Questions Now

Employers should consider asking a few key, ever-evolving questions about their current drug-screening policies right now.

Reidy suggests asking:

  • What do your drug and alcohol policies actually say?
  • Are you even asking about medications in the workplace? If so, why?
  • Are you asking about the current use of illicit or illegal drugs?
  • For nationwide companies, how do you draft policy in states where marijuana is either medically or recreationally legal? Do you default to federal law or try to accommodate employees and prospective candidates in those positions?

Hard answers may not exist on how to accommodate every employer and employee concern, but asking these questions now will help prepare you for issues that could arise as state laws continue to evolve. If marijuana legislation begins to affect your state, you will be more familiar with the possible pressure points that may influence your policies.

 2. Know Risks and Current State Laws

During the HR Break Room podcast, Reidy cited risk management as one of the most important aspects of changing state laws.

“HR professionals generally work in risk management, and one issue with risk management is safety and productivity, “Reidy said. “Twenty-six states now have medical marijuana approved, and eight states and the District of Columbia have recreational marijuana approved, and those numbers will likely increase in the next year or two. Employers are concerned about what impact it’s going to have on everything from attendance to mental acuity, productivity and largely safety.”

Take time to educate yourself on exactly what your state laws require before choosing a strategy. The better you understand your state’s legislation, the easier it will be to determine how it may impact your organization.

3. Communicating with Managers and Supervisors

According to Reidy, one of the most important things HR can do to prepare for changes is to learn about employee concerns by communicating and working closely with your managers.

“Assuming that they’ve tailored their policy appropriately to their workplace, to their locations, to their standards, their mission and the like, then I would spend a fair amount of time on training my supervisors and managers on the new policy,” he said. “Managers, I like to say, are your eyes and ears, but they’re also your Achilles’ heel. Be very careful with your managers … once managers have been trained, have them share policy changes and train them effectively to ensure they know what it means.”

Once your organization has created these clear channels of communication between HR, managers and employees, it will be easier to create a strategy for implementing a new policy if changes occur on a state or federal level.

4. No Universal Answer

Perhaps the biggest takeaway from our talk with Reidy was that there is no universal answer for all organizations, which is why employers must learn what works best for their business.

Reidy said it best, “employers, know your workplace, know your locations and know the state law that might apply. Be aware that the state law is certainly going to be different than the federal law, and have a realistic approach to screening and testing, and being consistent about your enforcement of your policy going forward.”

Learn more by subscribing to HR Break Room and listen to our podcast, A New Leaf in Drug Screening Policies: Is it Time for a Change?

 

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Employment Law, Featured

Caleb Masters

by Caleb Masters


Author Bio: Caleb is the host of The HR Break Room and a Webinar and Podcast Producer at Paycom. With more than 5 years of experience as a published online writer and content producer, Caleb has produced dozens of podcasts and videos for multiple industries both local and online. Caleb continues to assist organizations creatively communicate their ideas and messages through researched talks, blog posts and new media. Outside of work, Caleb enjoys running, discussing movies and trying new local restaurants.

Vacation

3 Ways an Employee’s Vacation Improves the Bottom Line

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3 Ways an Employee’s Vacation Improves the Bottom Line 

Temperatures are rising, days are longer and blockbuster movies are being released faster and more furiously. It must be summer – a season when most employees take time off to relax and unwind. In fact, approximately 46 percent of all travel occurs in July, the heart of summertime. If you’re worried productivity might take a nosedive (into the swimming pool) over the next few months, don’t sweat it. You might be surprised to learn these statistics and benefits of enjoying time outside of the office.

  1. Increased Productivity

Everyone deserves a break every now and then, right? And the good news is, most employers agree. According to recent research, 91 percent of full-time employees are given vacation time in their employment package. Yet, surprisingly, only 23 percent use their full paid time off (PTO), even though four out of five would choose benefits as vacation time over a pay raise. Why? According to a recent Forbes article, a fear of getting behind and the concern that others can’t do their work are leading factors to remaining on the clock and off the beach.

One of the best ways you can increase productivity is by fostering a culture with a healthy work-life integration. That means taking time out of the office to enjoy the big (and little) things in life, from the Caribbean cruise of your dreams to watching your daughter’s dance rehearsal. According to research, employees who use their allotted PTO are 31 percent more productive over the course of a year than those who don’t. In fact, for every 10 hours of vacation time, there’s an 8 percent boost in performance review scores. And the higher the score, the better the quality of work.

  1. Improved Retention Rate

 Imagine your organization is like a ship, and your employees are the propeller, launching your company forward. In other words, employees either can make or break your company’s success; therefore, attracting and retaining world-class talent should be at the top of your priorities. And if vacation time is one of the biggest benefits employees seek in an employer, it’s a no-brainer that this employee motivation can affect the retention rate.

In recent reports, 23 percent of employees indicated they would be motivated to change jobs for more vacation days. That’s almost a quarter of the workforce! This is a problem because not only does turnover send the office morale plummeting, but increased turnover also creates added expenses in training new personnel, not to mention the time and money needed to get new hires up to speed. In light of this alarming statistic, ensure you are providing and allowing enough PTO to your employees. Otherwise, they could abandon ship altogether.

  1. Heightened Employee Engagement

 According to Forbes, employee engagement is defined as “the emotional commitment the employee has to the organization and its goals.” Chances are, if your employees are actively engaged with your company – meaning, they are invested in its successes and challenges – they are more likely to tackle more demanding projects, without being asked.

So how does a little extra PTO affect employee engagement? According to research from Quantum Workplace, employees who’ve taken time off in the last 30 days are approximately 16 percent more likely to be engaged than those who haven’t taken a vacation in the past 12 months. In that same study, 72 percent of employees who took off five or more consecutive days within the last month were more engaged, compared to 57 percent of employees who took a break over a year ago. With results like these, it’s easy to see why it’s essential to reset and recharge. Do yourself – and your employees, a favor this summer: encourage your workforce to take a well-deserved break.

To learn more about the benefits of paid time off and how it positively impacts your company, download our new “Sun, Sand and PTO Statistics: Vacationing by the Numbers” infographic.

 

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Talent Management, What Employees Want

Monica Johnson

by Monica Johnson


Author Bio: As Paycom’s client marketing specialist, Monica Johnson utilizes a mixture of marketing and human capital management knowledge gained from years of industry experience. A graduate from the University of Central Oklahoma, Johnson has been with Paycom since 2013 and has served in numerous roles during her career with the company. In her spare time, she enjoys baking, exploring Oklahoma City and sipping coffee, while reading a good book, at one of her favorite local shops.

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