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Corporate Health Insurance Trends You Need to Know

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The ever-rising cost of corporate health care is expected to increase by 4.4 percent this year. Couple that with rising pressure from hard-fought efforts to maintain compliance with the federal government’s Affordable Care Act, and some employers have chosen to waive benefits, placing more responsibility onto their employees, who pay more both in premiums and out-of-pocket costs.

According to a survey released yesterday, workers are paying roughly $100 more per month in medical costs than they were three years ago, and can expect to pay 37 percent of the expenses acquired from company health plans this year. That’s an increase from the 34 percent in 2011.

A higher price tag isn’t the only change employees will have to deal with in the near future. The study suggests that employees also will be required to shoulder more of the costs for covering their spouses and dependents. Although today, roughly 70 percent of employers believe offering subsidized insurance for spouses is important, more than half believe it will not be important in 2015 and beyond.

Get fit for $50

Employers are looking to make proactive changes, too. Incentive health programs is a method many companies are implementing in order to improve the overall health of their workers, and therefore, decrease visits to the doctor’s office, clinic or hospital.

In increasing numbers, companies are offering an array of wellness activities to the workforce, such as boot camps and weight-loss competitions. Oftentimes, cash is the ultimate prize; on average, employees who complete all available programs could be $50 richer.

Retired and uninsured

Another serious issue facing employees – especially those considering retiring before age 65 – is the possibility that they may not have insurance coverage upon retirement. Public exchanges may become the sole option for pre-65 retirees as a reported 66 percent of companies are likely to eliminate access to coverage.

Where do we go from here?

According to the survey, only 25 percent of companies were confident they’d be providing current benefits to workers by 2024. Employers and employees need to start planning now for what’s to come. With rapid change taking place on a daily basis, “later” could mean “tomorrow,” so action planning should start today. For employees, perhaps that just means educating yourself on these trends and options, while for employers, it could mean a reconfiguration of your benefits strategy.



Author Bio: Lauren is an enthusiastic writer who is passionate about numerous topics surrounding the HCM industry including talent management and acquisition, technology, document management and leadership. Lauren is a former Paycom blogger, social strategist and community relations coordinator.

ACA ‘Cadillac Tax’ Delayed to 2022

ACA ‘Cadillac Tax’ Delayed to 2022

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The short-term spending bill that ended the government shutdown on Jan. 22 included a small provision that again delayed the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) “Cadillac tax,” now to 2022.

So nicknamed because it targets employer-sponsored health plans with the most generous level of benefits, the Cadillac tax originally was to take effect in 2018. In 2015, the effective date was pushed to 2020, and now the new bill pushes the effective date two additional years into the future.

When – or if – the Cadillac tax goes into effect, it will impose a 40% excise on the cost of employer-sponsored health coverage exceeding a certain dollar value per employee. The dollar value would have been $10,200 for individual coverage and $27,500 for family coverage in 2018, had the tax not been delayed. The law calls for the amount to be adjusted annually with growth in the consumer price index.

How does this affect Employers?

Employers do not have to contend with the tax for an additional two years. The IRS has not yet issued regulations addressing implementation; with this additional delay, the agency likely will not do so in the near future.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

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Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Deadline Extended

Employer Deadline Extended for Furnishing 2017 ACA Forms

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Distribution of 2017 Affordable Care Act (ACA) Forms 1095-B or -C to your employees has been extended.

As issued in Notice 2018-06, the IRS has extended the deadline from Jan. 31 to March 2. (However, the deadline to provide Forms W-2 and 1099 to employees and contract workers remains as Jan. 31.)

Filing deadlines unchanged

While the deadline to furnish forms was extended, the filing deadlines remain the same: Feb. 28 for paper forms, and April 2 for electronic forms.

IRS Notice 2018-06 emphasizes that employers who do not comply with the due dates for furnishing or filing are subject to penalties under sections 6722 or 6721.

Good-faith transition relief extended

The IRS also announced the extension of good-faith transition relief. This may allow an employer to avoid some penalties if it can show that it made good-faith efforts to comply with the information reporting requirements for 2017.

This relief applies only to incorrect and incomplete information reported on the ACA forms, and not to a failure to file or furnish the forms in a timely manner. Additionally, the IRS stated it does not anticipate extending either the good-faith transition relief or the furnishing deadline in future years.

Contact a trusted tax professional if you have questions on how this may affect your business specifically.

Click here to read more about how the ACA is affect by the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Employers Unaffected by ACA Changes in New Tax Law

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On December 22, President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill includes a provision that reduces the penalty for not complying with the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) individual mandate to $0, effectively removing the penalty for individuals who do not have health insurance coverage after the effective date of Jan. 1, 2019.

However, this update will not impact employers, since the law does not remove the employer mandate (the requirement that large employers offer health insurance coverage to their full-time employees or pay a penalty) or the associated employer reporting requirements. Large employers subject to the mandate still face penalties if they fail to comply with either, and the IRS has begun sending out notices with preliminary assessments of the employer shared responsibility penalty for tax year 2015.

Employers subject to the employer mandate should continue to comply and be prepared to file Forms 1094 and 1095 with the IRS in accordance with the normal deadlines.

For the 2017 tax year, the deadlines to provide Forms 1095-C to employees is Jan. 31, 2018.  The deadline to file Forms 1094-C and 1095-C with the IRS is Feb. 28, 2018 if filing paper forms, and April 2, 2018, if filing electronically.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

Posted in ACA, Blog, Compliance, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

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