Employee Engagement

Transform Company Leaders Into Engagement Ambassadors

By

Jennifer Kraszewski

| Jun 18, 2018

High employee engagement is linked to higher profits, greater productivity, lower turnover rates and a slew of other positive business outcomes. For years, HR leaders have worked to establish positive protocols and cultivate constructive environments to meet the shifting needs of a changing workforce. However, new research suggests engagement responsibilities should expand from the HR department to include the C-suite.

Why diversify?

Company leaders have a huge impact on employee engagement levels. According to the 2018 Global Leadership Forecast by Development Dimensions International (DDI), “leaders continue to wield the greatest single impact on workplace engagement.” When companies work from the top down to ignite innovation and excitement in employees, everybody wins.

A 2017 Harvard Business Review article praises managers who are able to deliver profits while creating a positive work culture: “Having the ability to simultaneously drive for results and practice excellent people skills is a powerful combination that has a dramatic impact on a leader’s effectiveness.”

Below are a few high-level priorities HR can focus on to invest in their leaders so employee engagement levels may rise companywide.

Anatomy of a leader

It turns out that a good chunk of company leaders understands the importance of engagement and purpose. DDI’s study found 71% of leaders viewed their role as “a custodian of the organization’s purpose.” Also, nearly 75% of those surveyed said they supported critical activities that aligned with the company’s goals.

Although many individuals hold upper-management titles, HR leaders need to identify dynamic leaders who are not only results-driven, but also value employee engagement. A few qualities to look for include:

  • positive communicators who compel vision and set clear, strategic directions with their written and verbal communications
  • achievement-oriented individuals who create a healthy sense of urgency, trust their teams, hold people accountable and set high standards
  • relationship-minded people who build relationships slowly and systematically while keeping old relationships healthy
  • coachable individuals who can both deliver and receive critical feedback with grace

Tools for success

Once HR identifies dynamic leaders whom they can utilize as ambassadors of engagement, they can equip them with the right tools to succeed. A few tangible ways to do this include:

  • making certain leaders are exposed to realistic challenges in order to prepare them for future ups and downs
  • clearly communicating business goals, as well as the case for employee engagement in internal communications
  • having periodic, positive callouts when leaders succeed in inspiring their teams
  • setting up mentoring programs where budding leaders have built-in accountability partners and can learn coaching techniques from the best
  • selecting senior-level managers as engagement catalysts to help build a positive culture, since change starts at the top

Employee engagement isn’t just for HR. Workers who consistently see upper management communicating strategically, supporting their teams and valuing each employee’s contribution, have a successful blueprint worth following. When HR and company leaders team up with both the bottom line and an engaged workforce in mind, victory is theirs for the taking.

About the Author

Jennifer Kraszewski

Jennifer Kraszewski, Paycom’s Director of Human Resources, has more than 20 years of HR leadership experience, driving transformative, business-focused human capital strategies in high-growth industries to achieve efficiencies, compliance and employee engagement. Kraszewski holds a bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and an MBA from Oklahoma City University, and is SPHR- and SHRM-SCP-certified.

See more posts by Jennifer Kraszewski